Guidelines, Alliances and Recruitment – The Latest Steps to Address Cybersecurity from the State to International Stage [Weekly Cybersecurity Brief]

As we’ve witnessed over the course of 2021 so far, cybersecurity’s spotlight has been forced to grow brighter. Between a variety of attacks, evolving vulnerabilities and high-profile meetings, there has been an onslaught of events enforcing its significance. But it seems that the more prominent the conversation becomes, the more issues we realize that need to be handled. Some of those issues that persist are threats with an international scale, ransomware and talent shortages. This week’s news offered a glimpse into some of the solutions being proposed in order to address these concerns.

In a recent meeting known as the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, leaders from Australia, India, Japan and the United States gathered to share their commitment to cybersecurity measures. In addition to its focus on topics such as China and 5G networks, the convening was “a detailed joint initiative to map overall capacity,” as one U.S. administration official stated. Included in that capacity is the ability to further develop critical infrastructure resiliency, a necessity for all four participating countries according to the official. 

As alliances were being drawn to tackle cybersecurity concerns like critical infrastructure, the Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released a guide advising on another mounting problem – ransomware. In the “Ransomware Profile” the organization outlined what can be done to help in preventing and responding to such attacks. The guide consists of basic approaches like a consistent use of antivirus software and keeping computers patched and preventative measures like putting together a recovery plan and testing capabilities in backing up data.

In order to follow through on such commitments and guidelines, it is a necessity to have strong cybersecurity teams in place. However, the AP recently reported on the lack of professionals that continues to plague sectors of the field, particularly at the state level. “There’s a severe shortage of those professionals and not enough financial firepower to compete with federal counterparts, global brands and specialized cybersecurity firms,” wrote Kathleen Foody. As her reporting shared, CyberSeek found that there were 9,000 unfulfilled state cybersecurity jobs as of this summer. Nicole Beebe, chair of the department of information security and cyber security at the University of Texas at San Antonio, suggested that part of this issue lies in recruitment efforts. She pointed out to the AP that states could benefit from sending representatives to college and career fairs much like private and federal organizations do. 

 

Key Takeaways:

“Quad Pushes Chip Supply Security, 5G ‘Diversification,’ Cybersecurity” – Colin Clark, Breaking Defense

https://breakingdefense.com/2021/09/quad-pushes-chip-supply-security-5g-diversification-cybersecurity/

  • In a recent meeting known as the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, leaders from Australia, India, Japan and the United States gathered to share their commitment to cybersecurity measures.
  • One U.S. official described it as “a detailed joint initiative to map overall capacity.”
  • Included in the conversation was an agreement to address critical infrastructure cybersecurity.

“NIST Issues Cybersecurity Framework for Ransomware Risk Management” – McDermott Will & Emery, JDSupra

https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/nist-issues-cybersecurity-framework-for-3692157/

  • The Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently released a guide advising organizations on how to address the issue of ransomware.
  • The “Ransomware Profile” outlines what can be done to help in preventing and responding to such attacks.
  • The guide consists of basic approaches like a consistent use of antivirus software and keeping computers patched and preventative measures like putting together a recovery plan and testing capabilities in backing up data.

“States at disadvantage in race to recruit cybersecurity pros” – Kathleen Foody, AP

https://apnews.com/article/business-technology-internships-0d7fc0ee18295585292b2e13b62e88f3

  • States are struggling to compete in recruiting cybersecurity professionals.
  • “There’s a severe shortage of those professionals and not enough financial firepower to compete with federal counterparts, global brands and specialized cybersecurity firms,” wrote Kathleen Foody.
  • CyberSeek found that there were 9,000 unfulfilled state cybersecurity jobs as of this summer.
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